Meet the Women of NRL Victoria

The National Rugby League's vision for women and girls is to ensure they continue to be included, respected and engaged equally in all aspects of Rugby League.

 Over 190,000 women and girls are participating in all forms of Rugby League (touch, tag and tackle) and with female participation the fastest growing category in the Game, it is more crucial than ever to continue to build a success platform for further participation and engagement.

 We at NRL Victoria contacted clubs and women from around the NRL Victoria competition to get an insight as to how they go about their lives in rugby league.

 

Bernadette Reeves – Mernda Dragons – Club Secretary/Club Founder

 

How and when did you initially get involved in rugby league?
Initially as the daughter of a coach (before girls could play) helping with team sheets and other random duties. I then had my own child who played in the NT we then moved to Victoria where saw a gap in club locations and with the help of NRL Victoria started up our current club.

 

What does it mean to you for rugby league to recognise Women in League?
To be honest it means a lot, each week around our country there are mums, sisters, aunties, daughters etc working hard to keep our sport alive. Sometimes we forget the behind the scenes people (men and women) and it's nice to recognise them.

 

What do you find most rewarding about working in rugby league?
I personally love seeing how it brings people together into a big family like system. The sport (in the right club setting) can develop our younger generation; it gives them something to look forward to whilst ensuring they remain involved in a positive role model environment away from home and school.

 

Tiahnee Paterson – Werribee Bears – Vice President

 

How and when did you initially get involved in rugby league? 
When I moved to Australia in 2003 I knew a little about rugby league, but it wasn't until 2007 when I met my fiancé and became a member of the Melbourne Storm that my love of the game grew.  When my son was old enough, in 2015, we registered him with the Werribee Bears. In 2016 I was asked to be the secretary and in 2017 took up the position of Vice President.

 

What does it mean to you for rugby league to recognise Women in League? 
As a club we look forward to the day that the female participation in rugby league is as strong as the men.  To recognise the women in our club, in any club, shouldn't be a 'round', we should recognise everyone, male or female, green or orange, 6 or 36 every day of the year.  Our players, supporters, club members, coaches, managers and volunteers all deserve recognition.  Women have always been a huge part of rugby league for years, but probably more behind the scenes.  

 

What do you find most rewarding about working in rugby league?  
I love rugby league and I love our club.  I love what our members, supporters and volunteers have brought back to our club this year, it's a family.  We have our ups & downs, but at the end of the day we are all there for each other.  From setting up the grounds at 7am on a Saturday, watching our cubs run around, our competition teams try their hardest every game, and our seniors playing for each other and the club, and packing it all away at the end of the day, I am just proud to be a part of the Werribee Bears.  We don't do it for the accolades we do it because it’s what we love, and I have made some amazing friends along the way that I would consider family.

 

 Jo McFarlane – Frankston Raiders – Club Secretary

 

How and when did you initially get involved in rugby league?
I've watch league since 1998 when Melbourne Storm become part of the NRL.
I've personally been involved with the club since 2015 when the club was founded. My son played then I become club secretary and it has been very rewarding in a lot a ways.  My family and I have made new friends who now we class as family.

 

What does it mean to you for rugby league to recognise Women in League?
It’s so important because a lot of the kids even the NRL players today wouldn't be where they are if it wasn't for great women who took them to games and training. The game has grown so much now that women are allowed to participate in the sport.  Let hope that the growth for girls and women continues, it great to see that there is other sports that women can choose rather the stereotype sports that women have been pigeon holed into.

 

What do you find most rewarding about working in rugby league?
Watching the young kids playing out on the field each week with smiles on their faces. Knowing that they are having fun and that they are the future of this great sport.

 

 

Sharyn Thomson – North West Wolves - President

  

How and when did you initially get involved in rugby league?
When my son was 5 he started playing mini league. As he has moved up grades my involvement has increased from parent watching to team manager to club president. 

 

What does it mean to you for rugby league to recognise Women in League?
Grass roots league relies so heavily on volunteers, so many mums, aunties, grandmas; sisters help out over the season at their clubs that getting recognition is nice! We do it for our kids so that they can enjoy the experiences of playing team sports in an environment that is enjoyable.

 

What do you find most rewarding about working in rugby league?
The families and people that become your "winter family" every season are the best! Seeing kids play and their parents pride from the sidelines is awesome.
And nothing beats the adrenaline and experience waking up on home game day, it's always crazy busy but it's also really fun even if you do collapse into a heap by the end of the day! I love it

 


 

Roz Grady – Victorian Rugby League Referees Association (Formerly Altona/Werribee) - Secretary


How and when did you initially get involved in rugby league? 
My son started playing rugby league in 2009. Since then I have covered many roles including: Club Treasurer, Club Registrar, Club Secretary, Team Manager, Team Water Runner and Team Sports Trainer.

 

What does it mean to you for rugby league to recognise Women in League? 
Means a lot as I believe most of the behind the scenes action is completed by women (mums, wives, partners, sisters), not only for clubs in general but also players.

 

What do you find most rewarding about working in rugby league?
The reward of knowing you have help someone achieve their goal, whether that be playing or refereeing or just becoming a volunteer themselves. 

 

Extra Comments
I enjoy watching the game whether it be grassroots level or NRL, watching the players or watching the referees. I just love the game, which is strange to some given that I am Victorian born.

 

Alicia McCredden – Victorian Rugby League Referees Association/Sunbury Tigers – Referee/Junior Mum           

                                                                                                                     

How and when did you initially get involved in rugby league?  
I attended my first League game with my Uncle in 1999 and thoroughly enjoyed myself and fell in love with the game. My son started playing at 5yrs old in 2013. In his second year I would help the coach on training nights and you could find me at the Scorers' table for a better view whenever I could get there. In 2015 I started co-coaching my son's team and began refereeing games mainly to help the club out and became Accredited in July of the same year. In 2016 I was head coach of my son's u9 team but was unable to participate in much refereeing due to pregnancy. This year I am not coaching, however I have returned to refereeing a couple of games a week.

                 

What does it mean to you for rugby league to recognise Women in League?
I think it's important for everyone involved in League to be recognised. I appreciate the extra effort of recognising the women who support the sport as often they are the driving force behind grassroots level and the number 1 supporters of their sons, husbands, brothers, etc at the highest level. We're often the loudest and proudest at the local level.              

 

What do you find most rewarding about working in rugby league?
I love the sport so it's easy to work hard to make it enjoyable for everyone involved. The most rewarding thing is definitely the smiles on the kids' faces on the field. That's ultimately what I'm there for each week.            

 

Tania Kaiwai - Doveton Steelers – Club Registrar/Committee Member/Women’s Tag Player      

 

How and when did you initially get involved in rugby league?
After moving from New Zealand mid July 2005, I got involved with rugby league in 2007 as secretary of Doveton Steelers. This was after supporting my partner Neville who was playing for Doveton Steelers in 2006.

 

What does it mean to you for rugby league to recognise Women in League? 
I think it is important and great to celebrate the growing influence of women in rugby league not only behind the scenes but also on the field to. Just to know that we are appreciated for what we do is an achievement in its self. To now have women playing also is great. It’s our moment where women can get out there and show case our skill we have. 
                 

What do you find most rewarding about working in rugby league?
Definitely seeing our club succeed as a whole. Watching our little ones grow, and having fun. And as they get older watching them succeed by making state teams and then moving on to bigger and better opportunities in league. Watching the growth in women’s tag/Tackle and now with our school girls having the opportunity to go to state, I look forward to programs being made available to them and hopefully the induction of an U17s tackle comp.     

                                                                                                                                                                                                      

Mia Selio - South Eastern Titans Rugby League Club - Club Secretary 
                 

How and when did you initially get involved in rugby league? 
I got involved through my family; they have been with the Titans for many years. I've been playing Women’s Tackle for 3 years and I have been a part of the committee for 2.       

 

What does it mean to you for rugby league to recognise Women in League?
It means everything, it gives those little girls hope that they one day can be able to play league and that it isn't just a "man's" sport. It's great to see all the women playing and behind the scenes driving the sport being recognised.

 

What do you find most rewarding about working in rugby league? 
It's definitely seeing the smiling children; everything I do at the South Eastern Titans is to help build the club for the kids to enjoy so it makes all the late nights and lack of sleep worth it.   

 


 

Joanne Manuel - Northern Thunder Rugby League Club – Club Female Coordinator, Player, Committee Member, Coach, Assistant Coach to Victorian Women’s and Under 16 State Representative Sides

  

How and when did you initially get involved in rugby league? 
I married into a very staunch rugby League family from the mid 80’s and have been an avid follower from the Winfield cup days. In 2010 our daughter got involved in the Girls tag team with Northern Thunder Rugby League club and that’s where our journey began in Victoria.  Since then I have managed, trained, and coached Girls and women’s Tag teams over the season and this year introducing our first Women’s Club league team whom I assistant coach and train alongside my very supportive husband coach.  I also got involved in the NRL Vic state sides as the Assistant Coach for Women’s Tag Team and our first U16’s Girls State team this year whom travelled to CAS and have been an advocate on the NRL Advisory committee for females in league. I also developed an off season program in 2014 called “Females In Action” which targets all females in giving it ago in Touch football, Rugby league and Rugby League tag involving state players, coaches to assist in bringing rugby league skills to the North.

 

What does it mean to you for rugby league to recognise Women in League?  
Women have been around Rugby league for a very long time and in roles behind the scenes and with a shift in culture on what females can provide in more on field roles is definitely something to celebrate. Women in League have evolved from running canteens, driving players to games and training & washing jerseys which we all continue to do.   To contributing to roles such as coaching, trainers, managers, committee members, administrative roles and local grass roots club president roles.  Women have been taking on more active administrative roles and in doing so acknowledging their contribution and celebrating the milestones is a fantastic effort by all. 

Congratulations to all the women in league both off and on the field and all the Mums, Sisters, Aunties and Nan’s who continually support everyone!

 

What do you find most rewarding about working in rugby league?  
The most enjoyable thing I have come across in rugby league is the enjoyment of player’s faces when they achieve something they never thought they would.  To see their faces when they catch that high ball from kick off and they dreaded it all season and they caught it.  To scoring their first try when it’s their third season.  To watching players grow as a person and a player both on and off the field.  To watching someone who was so timid become a leader.“Watching a Dad hug his daughter with pride when she was named in the state team” Those moments you can never replace and are why I continue to do what I do. It’s not the winning or the accolade’s but the little things in between that make the journey to those milestones so much sweeter.

 

Sheelagh Howarth - Eastern Raptors Rugby League Club - Vice President, Uniform/Merchandise Manager, Under 11's team manager, 2017 Knox City Council Volunteer of the Year.

 

How and when did you initially get involved in rugby league? 
My family and I are avid Melbourne Storm fans and we became actively involved in rugby league in 2013, when my son, then aged 5, wanted to play. I was 'volunteered' for the role of team manager by my husband at training one night and have never looked back, from there I have relished in becoming more involved within our club and the NRL Victoria community. Being Vice President has meant that I can really promote and grow our club and our sport in the local community, it has given me the opportunity to interact with players and families across all ages within our club, and be involved in the decision making processes within our organization.

 

What does it mean to you for rugby league to recognise Women in League?  
I think it’s important to recognize the contribution to women in league, from those Mums who wash uniforms and work in the canteen, to those girls who pull on their footy boots each week to those in administrative positions, it breaks down the gender stereotypes and creates equality.  To celebrate the fact that our sport is encouraging women to be involved in a once male dominated sport, and to encourage both genders to develop that sense of community, belonging and friendship that comes from being involved in rugby league. It also encourages more women to become involved and assures them that their contribution is valued. We have many wonderful women involved in all facets of roles within our club and I'm proud to be a positive role model for the young female players. 

 

What do you find most rewarding about working in rugby league?
The aspect I find most rewarding about being involved in rugby league comes from my team managing; I love being involved directly with the kids, and it is undoubtedly my favourite role. Getting to watch them grow and develop as players, create friendships and the joy they get out of the sport. Running around with them at training and being on the sidelines to encourage them is great. I get to develop such a great bond with these kids and families it’s really special. It’s so rewarding to be part of that "team".

 

Lana Utatao - Casey Warriors RLC - Club Secretary, Team manager

 

How and when did you initially get involved in rugby league?
Over 10 years ago – We registered our son to play rugby league for Casey Chiefs. After attending a few training sessions, the club called a team meeting. Like any other club – Lack of volunteers. The u7s needed a coach and manager for the team to continue. We decided to put our hands up to volunteer our time and to support our son and his team mates. And that’s how it began, like most volunteers in the community we do it because of our children and the love for this game.

 

What does it mean to you for rugby league to recognise Women in League? 
“Saying Thank you”

Say thanks to your mum every time she drives you to training or to games. Every time she washes your uniform or gets ice for your knee. Say thanks to the ladies running the water. Say thanks to the ladies in the canteen when they pass you your hot chips. In fact, say thanks to everyone. Rugby league is for everyone, whether it’s a fan, player volunteer or referee – we thank you all.

 

What do you find most rewarding about working in rugby league?
Saturday mornings – seeing the little u6s playing their game. That’s what keeps me coming back, the passion these kids have for the game. The grassroots are strong for rugby league in Victoria. Then the afternoon rolls around – first grade runs out on the field. That’s always very exciting – kids look up to these players. Maybe one day playing first grade or even playing in the NRL. This is where dreams are made of. I don’t need to be recognized for the work I do around the club – I do it because I love it! I love this game “Rugby League”

 

 

Holly Fuda – National Rugby League Game Development – Lead Game Development Officer

 

How and when did you initially get involved in rugby league? 
I have been involved in Rugby League since a very young age. I grew up in Sydney, NSW following the Sydney Roosters. I played different forms of the game throughout my teenage life, as there were no options for me to play tackle. Since moving to Melbourne I have been involved in NRL Victoria for about 7 years.

                                                                                                                                                       

What does it mean to you for rugby league to recognise Women in League?  
It is so exciting to see the NRL recognising the females involved in the game and it is even more exciting to see so many more females participating in the game.It is inspiring to see such immense growth in female participation across the game and especially in Victoria. In the local school competitions over the last two years we have seen an extra 5,000 females playing a form of the game. More recently the inclusion of Secondary School Tackle competitions has been extremely well received in the local Victorian community.

             

What do you find most rewarding about working in rugby league?  ​
Working in rugby League in an AFL dominated state is tough, however so rewarding when you see students playing the game, when previously they had not participated. The fun, excitement and happiness on the face of anyone enjoying rugby league is enough to make me smile too.The growth throughout Melbourne is also rewarding to know that what we do for the community is giving back to the game.         


 

Elly Buchanan - Pakenham Eels RLC and Touch Association Inc - Club Secretary, Social Media Manager and U6 Coach.

 

How and when did you initially get involved in rugby league?
I was introduced to the game of Rugby League by my Queensland born boyfriend 14 years ago (who now happens to be my husband), whilst watching State of Origin with our NSW supporting housemate. Suffice to say, the keen rivalry between the two states of QLD and NSW was enough to make this Victorian-born-Rugby-League-virgin into a fan. From then on, I have supported and loved watching the game of Rugby League in every aspect, from the State of Origin to the World Cup tournaments, and of course, I had immediately become a member of the Melbourne Storm in 2007 to support my city and my team.

My son, Atticus, had already been a Melbourne Storm member since he was born in 2008 and was finally old enough to participate in Billy Slater’s ‘Billy’s Buddies’ clinic, in which allowed this little 4-year-old an opportunity old to sink his teeth into the game in a playing aspect through the drills and activities at the clinic. This in turn, encouraged me to research about getting my 4 turning 5-year-old signed up to the local Rugby League Competition, which back then was called VRL – Victorian Rugby League. In 2013, I registered my son Atticus to play with the South Eastern Titans RLC based in Dandenong, and started to get heavily involved with Rugby League in a volunteer capacity as a general committee member, primarily doing Social Media content as my work background is in digital marketing.

In 2014, there was the opportunity to play for a Women’s Tackle tournament that VRL were conducting, of which I joined, where there were 3 x gala days to showcase Women’s Tackle. This allowed for the following year (2015) to have a Women’s First Grade Tackle Competition to commence with NRL VIC.  But my playing days were well over before it ever really began, and I concentrated more on the backend of the NRL Vic competition, and had been in discussions with NRL VIC about starting a new Rugby League Club based out of Pakenham (Cardinia Shire) in the 2ndhalf of 2015.

Together with my husband - Jason Buchanan as well as Justin McGee and Jaevarn McGee, and after many meetings and discussions with the Cardinia Shire and NRL Vic, we founded Pakenham Eels RLC and Touch Association and became a registered Incorporation in January 2016.

Pakenham Eels RLC’s inaugural year saw us have 105 registered playing members to include U7, U9, U10, U12, U14, GTAG and 2nd Division Men’s teams submitted into the NRL VIC competition which is a massive achievement for a second year club. We also ran a Touch Association competition with support from NRL Touch Football and VicHealth during the summer of 2016/2017 with 178 registered players over 10 Open Mixed teams. Currently as the Coach for U6’s, as well as being Club Secretary and Social Media Manager for Pakenham Eels RLC, my Rugby League season is busy, busy, busy and I wouldn’t want it any other way.

 

What does it mean to you for rugby league to recognise Women in League?
For Rugby League to commemorate and recognise Women in League is incredibly important to me, as it outlines and demonstrates the gender equality that the Rugby League community heavily wants to push and be a part of. There are many aspects as to how the Rugby League community develops and includes women in the game, and it doesn’t do this just by having a ‘Women in League’ Round. For me I gain confidence in Rugby League’s sense of importance of women in league by the encouragement of female NRL Development officers going out to schools to help promote the game of Rugby League, to the female coaches and team managers trained every year to help volunteer coach and manage our young players, to the women that help run the club management by being Club Presidents, Vice Presidents, Junior and Senior Co-ordinators, Secretaries, Treasurers, or general club committee members and to the women that actually play Rugby League in the Women’s competition. All these aspects of female participation and involvement in Rugby League are positive factors towards what it means to me as how women are valued in Rugby League for their qualities, skill sets and the extra value-add advantage females bring to the credibility of the game.

 

What do you find most rewarding about working in rugby league?
Just being around people that are so passionate, almost a religious-cult-like passion about Rugby League is what I find most rewarding about working in Rugby League. It’s seeing the pure joy in kid’s faces at training as they gain and learn new skills and have made new friends outside of school or church that makes working in Rugby League really satisfying. Where game-days are gladiatorial-like showcases, a testament to the new skills learned at training and the nerve-wracking, yet satisfying achievements of scoring a first try, or making an effective tackle or pulling off the practiced game play.  It’s not just the players that make working as a volunteer in Rugby League rewarding, it’s the parents of members, and the people that offer their time for free that you meet in Rugby League that become lifelong friends, all because of the common shared love of Rugby League… it’s what being part of a club is all about, a sense of belonging and being a part of something good.  That’s the best bit – just being a part of something good.

 

 

Jamie Te Pania - Truganina Rabbitohs Rugby League Club, Victorian Women’s State Representative and Captain, Combined Affiliated States Selected Player


How and when did you initially get involved in rugby league?
I've grown up around Rugby League all my life.  When you have brothers that play, being interested and involved in the sport was just a natural thing to do.  I've probably culminated over 10 years of playing experience.


What gives you motivation while you’re out on the field?
When I see the development and growth of the players around me (especially if they've been 'anxious' about tackling or catching a high ball) and to see them excel in a sport I love, that's what motivates me.


What does it mean to you for rugby league to recognise Women in League?
It's an amazing feeling to see how far women's rugby league has come over the years.  Having played in New Zealand and now Australia, it's great to see the recognition and support the NRL are providing the women as it's encouraging more girls/ladies to take up the game.  I've experienced first-hand the ground breaking traditions they are overcoming in order to provide equality between the men's and women's teams and that is how we create 'change' and 'promote' women's rugby league.  

 

What is your proudest moment in rugby league?
Playing rugby league as long as I have, it's hard to pick a 'proud moment' as there are so many but notably at this present time, I would have to say winning the '2017 Affiliated States Championships' for Victoria and being selected for the Combined Affiliated State (CAS) team in my chosen position (full back).

 

 

Sheridan Thomas – Sunbury Tigers – Committee Member, Club Registrar, Sports Trainer, League Safe, Social Media person, Grounds Manager
 

How and when did you initially get involved in rugby league?  
We have always loved rugby, but actually came from the dark side aka. a background in rugby union. My husband Nathan (who now coaches at SURLC) played with Ballarat University for approximately 12 years, however was forced to retire when he sustained a serious neck injury (he's fine but was advised by a neuro that couldn't play any more). 


When our son was old enough we headed down to the local club and checked things out. Aidan began playing in the U7's (he was 5 years old) and now 7 years later my husband and I continued to heavily support the club and we now have two boys playing for our wonderful club ... Aidan U11's and Lachlan U8's.


What does it mean to you for rugby league to recognise Women in League?  
It great to get the recognition, but there are a lot of people who put their heart and soul into making sure out club runs fantastically. It is not until you step into a committee or an official role that you actually see how much work has to be done to run a club.


What do you find most rewarding about working in rugby league?
The most rewarding part of rugby is to see my boys and actually my husband too, having fun and just loving the game.

 

Roberta Butler - Waverley Oakleigh Panthers Rugby League Club – Members Protection Information Officer, Committee Member, Life Member

                                 

How and when did you initially get involved in rugby league? 
1987 which is how I met my husband. I became fully involved during the development of my children in 2005

                 

What does it mean to you for rugby league to recognise Women in League? 
To have women involved and recognised in League has changed the dynamics of the rugby league industry. An avenue for all family members to participate in a sport together. It creates an opportunity for women to develop in the sport and excel in pathways that were never available in previous years. As a woman & a mother in League, who participates in rugby league & women’s tag; it created being part of a team, it’s a form of exercise that provided fitness levels at my own personal pace which if I chose to; could have led to a professional level. Opportunities available to be a part of the coaching staff as a Sports Trainer, Coach, Team Manager and many more.

                 

What do you find most rewarding about working in rugby league?​
Being involved with other women and families. The satisfaction to be able to help players, families and other community members. To watch players from as young as 6yrs old; grow and develop skills and seeing them represent your state and being part of an NRL development team. Seeing them debut at NRL Level. Witnessing young girls and Ladies representing rugby league at state level as well as national level.

 

Sue Hobson - Sunshine Cowboys Rugby League Club - Registration Administrator

 

How and when did you initially get involved in rugby league?
I initially got involved in rugby league as a supporter within the last 2 years.  I also participated in Women’s Tag for 4 years.

I have a large family and friends group who play, support, manage and coach the game of Rugby League; they live and breathe the game which then empowers the rugby league passion of all that come in contact with the group.

 

What does it mean to you for rugby league to recognise Women in League?
Recognising Woman in League is an enormous compliment and appreciation to those hard working ladies (and men) that keep the operational wheels of a club ticking in the back ground.

There are woman from all walks of life and ethnic background contributing in some shape or form and no matter what role you play we should all be proud of what we achieve.

 

What do you find most rewarding about working in rugby league?
The most rewarding part of working in rugby league atmosphere is the satisfaction of ensuring every player gets to play the game we all love.  Knowing the work that goes on in the background to ensure each and every player is able to take the field.

The Team comradery, seeing the sense of pride and connection each player has for the player next to them, that emotion of knowing your part of a team and club that looks after each other no matter who you are.  It’s that extended family pride you feel being part of the rugby league community.

 

Shahana Te Tomo - Casey Warriors – Women’s First Grade Player, Victorian Representative Player, Combined Affiliated States Selected Player


How and when did you initially get involved in rugby league?
I've only been playing for about 4 years. The first game I played was an exhibition match at the annual Country of Origin event in 2013. I'll never forget it. I loved the culture of the game and our team. NRL Victoria then started Women's Tackle gala days on Sunday's. The first game I ever played in 2013 I enjoyed it so much I haven't stopped. Coming from League Tag I just really enjoyed the contact. 


What gives you motivation while you’re out on the field?
My family are a huge factor for me. They've supported me from the beginning and continue to push me to be the best I can on and off the field. My mum even plays alongside me at 42 years of age and has for the last 3 years! Im also a huge Melbourne Storm supporter and I remember one year my team was losing every game and I just felt like I wanted to give up and stop playing but i'd watch Cam Smith, Cooper Cronk and Billy Slater just grind it out week in and week out and it really inspired me to keep my head up and keep playing. Rugby league changed my life, made me a better person, that's why I make sure I give everything I have. 


What does it mean to you for rugby league to recognise Women in League?​
It's overwhelming, 4 years ago I would never ever have thought we'd have a thriving Women's competition in Victoria and it's because we've put in all the hard work to get us here so to be recognised for that time we've put in makes it all worth it and just encourages us to strive for a better competition and provide all the best opportunities for the females coming through. 

What is your proudest moment in rugby league?​
I have a couple that are at the top of the list. The first one was being awarded the Casey Warriors RLC Senior Player of the Year in 2016. I was chosen out of the whole senior club including the men so I felt like that was big step for our club as the first female player to win it. I remember being a little gutted because I didn't get MVP for my team and I just wanted to leave, then my trophy was announced and I got over it pretty quick.

The second moment was winning the Combined Affiliated States Championship and bringing that shield home in June. I worked so hard on my game, my skills, my attitude, strength, conditioning, and getting more experience ever since our first state campaign in 2015 in Darwin. I'd train outside of training, sometimes at 5am or 6am, I flew all around Australia trying to get more exposure, I started my preseason last November, I'm in the best condition i've ever been in so to finally win that shield was a relief, not because my job was done but because I finally felt like I was on the right path. 




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